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20091130
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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
of america, these negottions will not yield the kind of the nd of results that we are looking r. true, weould have hoped at the unitedtates of america wod have been more ambitious than whait has indicated. >>eporter: india is also one of the wod's largest producers of greenhouse gas issions, but is a relative newcor to an industrialized onomy. saran sa the country has concerns that a climate agreemencould stifle economic develoent. >> for us, climat change is not just a sepate issue, it is intermixed with our developmental, yoknow, issues itself. so how we balance,ou know, the problem of climate changeith the other stresses and strns that the count is going through as is process of social and economic transformaon, we wou hope that there is soe understanding of that challee that we face. >> reporter: mntime, a series of studies releed today in the british medil journal "the lacet" could give another boos to advocates of addrsing climate change. the studies fnd that cutting carbon emissions couldave millis of lives-- mosy by reducg the number of deaths from hearand lung diseases. >> climate ch
.com. >> what makes us an engine for the economy? plants across america. nearly 200,000 jobs created. we see beyond cars. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the senate geared up today for the real battle over health care reform. democratic leaders hoped to get their new bill to the floor-- nearly 10 months after the process began. "newshour" health correspondent betty ann bowser has our lead story report. >> this is a big bill it affects everybody in america. >> reporter: senate majority leader harry reid and fellow democrats edged closer today to moving a 2,000-page health care reform bill to the floor for debate. >> we all acknowledge this legislation is a tremendous step forward. >> reporter: reid unveiled the legislation last night with final cost estimates from the
usually protest against the revolution's old enemy: america. but these demonstrators are doing the opposite: protesting against their own regime and then running away with notorious basij militia, armed with batons and riot shields, in hot pursuit. the police had warned reformists not to exploit this anniversary. but it didn't work, so they moved in hitting this man on the pavement, and beating women. one is hit to the ground. a man who tries to intervene is dragged away by the hair. and then a woman takes her life into her own hands. >> ( translated ): there were many injured ladies who were hit very severely. they even followed people into residential buildings, i saw them forcing locks and breaking glass. the issue has changed. it is not about the election any more. it is about freedom of expression. >> reporter: the protesters fought back by filming what they could; and what they've posted on the internet contradicts the official version of events. outside the old u.s. embassy there was the traditional revolutionary rally. thousands of students were bussed in and shouted "d
, with the ideological disaeements with america or withoreign terrorist groups. there are wide range of leads being ru down >> gw: we haveeard today that major hasan is conscious and talking. have any of e investigators been able to ta to him yet? >> not so fa he has a litary lawyer who's askedirst of all for the investigaon to be moved, he can't get a ir trial given the publicity and presint obama is goindown to ft. hood tomorrow. >> gwenthere has been much reporting a commentary about potential lks between major hasan and people who li tmselveses to terrorism. what canou tell us based on your reporting? >> we are hearing a lot mo, and what we can say ght now is that amonthe focuseis major hasan's cssing pas with the northern virginia iman who hs left the couny and is an american-born ima but has emerg as one of the leading promoters of al qaedaow based overseas. his lecturhich areescribed as fiery and incendiary hav been found,ownloaded veral terrorismuspects in north america,anada and the uned kingm. inclung it aears though one the somali american you who haveeft the country to join an al qaeda lin
disagreements with america or with foreign terrorist groups. there are a wide range of leads being run down. >> gwen: we have heard today that major hasan is conscious and talking. have any of the investigators been able to talk to him yet? >> not so far. he has a military lawyer who's asked first of all for the investigation to be moved, he can't get a fair trial given the publicity and president obama is going down to ft. hood tomorrow. >> gwen: there has been much reporting and commentary about potential links between major hasan and people who link themselveses to terrorism. what can you tell us based on your reporting? >> we are hearing a lot more, and what we can say right now is that among the focuses is major hasan's crossing paths with the northern virginia iman who has left the country and is an american-born iman, but has emerged as one of the leading promoters of al qaeda now based overseas. his lectures which are described as fiery and incendiary have been found, downloaded on several terrorism suspects in north america, canada and the united kingdom. including it appears thoug
activit isslowed it's nowhereear the negative growth in america and europe. >> lehrer: and jeffrey brow presents images of e great epression through the lens o photographer dorothelange. >she developed an derstanding that you would have much more wer in the photograp because she features people. major funding for t newshour with jim lehrer is proved by: >> what theorld needs now is energy. the energy tget the economy humming again. the energto tackle challenges like climate change. what if that energcame from an ener company? everday, chevron invests $62 million in people, in ide-- seeking, teaching, buding. fueling growth arod the world to mo us all ahead. this is the power of han energy. chevron. >> e are intel, sponsors of tomorrow. >> andy wells fargo advisors. together, we'll go fa bnsf railway. a by toyota. and monsanto. the national sence foundation. supporting educati and search across all fields of science and engeering. and with the ongoing supportf these institutns and foundation and... this program was ma possible by the corporation r public broadcasting. and bcontributions
in this relationship. i have talked about chi-merica as a single economy, china plus america is a key driver to the expansion of the decade from '98 to 2007. and still in very many ways the key to the way that the global economy works today with the chinese exports, the u.s. importing a huge trade deficit between the united states and china. and china intervening in international currency markets in order to keep its own currency weak. but thereby financing at least a part of the u.s. deficit. china has become the banker to the united states. and its policy of reserve accumulation has provided us nearly $2 trillion worth of effectively cheap or if not free credit to the united states. so this is a very paradoxical relationship and i would liken it perhaps to a marriage that was once happy but it is now approaching a rather rocky period if not divorce. >> lehrer: rocky period if not a divorce, jim fallows. >> i think divorce, you can imagine that only as an extreme circumstances. for example, a disagreement over taiwan which remains a contentious issue or some other political shock. and other
:t's an anniversary wh iranians usually protest agait the revolution old enemy: america. but tse demonstrators are dog the opposite: protesng gainst their own regime and then running away with notorus basij militia, armed with batons andiot shields, in hot pursuit. the police had warned reformts not to exoit this anniversary. but didn't work, so they moved in tting this man on the paement, and beating women. one ihit to the ground. a man who trs to intervene is drgged away by theair. and then a woman kes her life into her own hands >> translated ): therwere many injureladies who were hit very severely. they even followed pple into sidential buildings, i saw them forcing locks andreaking glass. thissue has changed. it is noabout the election any re. it is about freedom of expression. >> porter: the protesters foght ck by filming what ty cou; and what they've posted on the internet contradis the ofcial version of events. outside the old u.sembassy there wathe traditional revolutionary rally. housands of students were bued in and shouted "death to israel" and "death america". the opposition marched wi
. >> what makes us anngine for the enomy? plants acrs america. nearly00,000 jobs created. we see beyond cars. and monsanto. and by thealfred p. sloan undation. suppoing science, technology, and improved econom performance andinancial literacyn the 21st century. and with the ongoing supporof these institutns and foundation and... this program was made ssible by the corration for publicroadcasting. and by contributio to your pbs statn from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: predent obama conrmed today he's rey to announchis decision on sending u.s. troops to afghantan. he said 'd spell out his plans after thanksgiving. margaret warner has ouread story repor >> warnerthe president met well into last night with h national security tea his tenth anfinal such session since september. today, it was wide reported he'll dress the nation tuesday night. >> i'll be making an annouement on how we intend to move forward. >> waer: the president spoke of his decion at a joint news confence with indian prime minist manmohan singh, who was making the firsstate visit of thobama presidency. >> ter eight ye
an engine for the economy? plants across america. nearly 200,000 jobs created. we see beyond cars. and monsanto. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: president obama confirmed today he's ready to announce his decision on sending u.s. troops to afghanistan. he said he'd spell out his plans after thanksgiving. margaret warner has our lead story report. >> warner: the president met well into last night with his national security team, his tenth and final such session since september. today, it was widely reported he'll address the nation tuesday night. >> i'll be making an announcement on how we intend to move forward. >> warner: the president spoke of his decision at a joint news conference with indian prime minister manmohan singh, who was
to supplement the steps we've already taken to put america back to work. that's what this forum is about. >> reporter: moments later, the president left the white house to begin a nine-day far east trip, full of its own challenges. he'll begin tomorrow in japan, where new prime minister yukio hatoyama is asserting some independence from the u.s. on foreign policy and trade. in china, the issues likely will include chinese concerns about u.s. budget deficits; u.s. complaints the chinese currency is undervalued; what to do about climate change; and how to deal with iran's and north korea's nuclear programs. but even overseas, the press of the health care initiative back home won't be far away. the president still is pushing democratic leaders in congress to pass a final bill by year's end. in recent days, mr. obama also has consoled the military community at fort hood, texas after 13 people were killed in last week's mass shootings. >> every evening that the sun sets on a tranquil town; every dawn that a flag is unfurled; every moment that an american enjoys life, liberty and the pursuit o
and inhart worked on their book 2007they began to see the tell-tale gns of crisis for america the profligate. >> hsing prices rising were very typical if you're abouto have a financial crisis, the equity price re, the borrowing from abroad, and the ft the economy was slowing downall the red ligh were blinking. they say they did y to warn a convtion of ecomists in a papethey gave in january, 2008. but you didn say to your colleagu: sell! sell! sell! >> no. we didt say, sell! sell! sell! but our paper said tt the united states wi be lucky not to have deep financial crisis. >> you know we're not seers,ut it allowed us say if history any guide were lucky if tha doesn't happen he and now. >> reporter: lucky we were n. whicwould have come as no surprise to the data. >> when you have a bignflow of foreign nds and we had a ssive one, you're at risk. when you deregulate ur markets rapidly, which we diin the states, that's also-very often happenthat you have a deep crisis. the real killer short term debt, debt that has toe refinanc all the time, well that's what the subprime w, you had to refance it
, remains unified in. for those w would exploit. haened in america, which makes it more troubling. that's why when whave some kind incident like this happen, despite our attet every day to hance understanding of islam,nd up being one ep forward and two steps ba for our commumity. just e facts we have to face in the st 9/11 era. >> reporter: today, amecan muslim groups roundly condemed the atck, the american arab anti-discrination committee lled him a "rogue" gunman. >> woodward:he other main tory of the day was unemployment hittindouble digits for the first me since 1983. th u.s. labor department annnced the jobless rateose to 10.2% inctober, up four nths. the econo lost another 190,000 jobs last month. at a congressional hearing, though, the head of t bureau of labor statists said the rate of b losses is slowing. >> e last -- last ree months the lo has been more mad rate than the prior three months are the priorix months before that. last tee months job losses average 1,000, that is significantly lower than the unprecedented period, six month periodhere we lost about 645,000 jobs per
in this relatiship. i have tald about i-merica as a single econo, china plus america is a keyriver to the expansion of thdecade from '98 to 200 and still in very many ways thkey to the way that the glob economy works today with the chinese ports, he u.s. importing a huge trade deficit betwe the united states and china and china inteening in inteational currency mkets in order to keep its n currency weak. but ereby financing at least a part of the u.s. deficit. china has come the banker to t united states. and its policy of reserve accumulation has prided us nearly $2 tllion worth of effectively che or if not free credit to the unied states. so thiis a very paradoxical relatnship and i wou liken it perhaps to a marriage thatas once happy but it isow approachi a rather rocky period inot divorce. >> lehr: rocky period if not a divorce, jim fallo. >> i think divce, you can imagine that only asn extre circumstances. r example, a disagreement over taiwan which remains a contentious issue osome other political shock. and otherwise there areeal imlances to be worked out. as we've heard, overhe last decade
this is the poweof human energy. chevron. >> what makeus an engine for e economy? plas across america. nearly 200,000 jobs creed. we see beyond cars. monsanto. producg more. conserving more. improving fmers' lives. that sustainable agriculture. more producemoreconseemore.com. intel. suprting coverage of innovation and the economy. >> and by wes fargo advisors. together, we'll go far. bnsf railway. and by the alfred psloan undation. supporting scnce, technology, and improved economi performance and financia literacy in the21st century. and with the ongoing suppo of thesinstitutions and undations. and... this program was made ssible by t corporation for public badcasting. and by contbutions to your pbs station from viewers like u. thank you. >> lehrer: president obam honored the vicms of the fort hod massacre today. he led theourners at an oudoor memorial service on the large army post icentral texas. nehour correspondent kwame holman has our lead sty report. ♪ >reporter: thousands of famy members, friends,nd fellow soldiers came from acrs the country today for theomber ceremonie they paitribute
in america. and the members of the house democrats are going to go into 2010. and they need a real message on this. so there was a minirevolt including among the black caucus in the congress that says look, you guys aren't messaging correctly or sufficiently on the jobs issue. you are talking about things that aren't as directly relevant to my constituents. >> lehrer: do you read it the same way. >> i don't think it's limited to democratic districts. i think the --. >> lehrer: everybody. >> i think it's everybody, universal. and it's not only jobs and unemployment which is an overriding concern. we have double-digit unemployment. >> there a total disconnect between the prosperity and plushness of wall street and the pain of main street. and so the people --. >> lehrer: that is what they brought out with quitener. >> exactly. >> lehrer: they are more than just up set, they are angry. >> they are angry and they look at the government economic policies and they say what got us to this point of chaos and crisis, it was the big banks and wall street. who are the beneficiaries of the economic po
and reinhart worked on their book in 2007, they began to see the tell-tale signs of crisis for america the profligate. >> housing prices rising were very typical if you're about to have a financial crisis, the equity price rise, the borrowing from abroad, and the fact the economy was slowing down, all the red lights were blinking. they say they did try to warn a convention of economists in a paper they gave in january, 2008. but you didn't say to your colleagues: sell! sell! sell! >> no. we didn't say, sell! sell! sell! but our paper said that the united states will be lucky not to have a deep financial crisis. >> you know we're not seers, but it allowed us to say if history is any guide were lucky if that doesn't happen here and now. >> reporter: lucky we were not. which would have come as no surprise to the data. >> when you have a big inflow of foreign funds and we had a massive one, you're at risk. when you deregulate your markets rapidly, which we did in the states, that's also-- very often happens that you have a deep crisis. the real killer is short term debt, debt that has to b
america's key ally in asia since thend of wld war ii, but must now cope ith china's continuing rise a regional and gbal power. by next year, china could eclipse japaas the world's second rgest economy. and on thitrip, the president will spend three da in china and just 24 hours in jap. president oba sought to reasse japan's new prime minister, yukio hatoyama. >> our alliancwill endure and our efforts wl be focused on revitalizing that frieship so tht it's even stronger and mo successful in meetg the challengesf the 21st century. it's essential for the ited stat, it's essential for japan, andt's essential for the asia pacific region. >> repoer: hatoyama called the u.s.-japanese allice the cornersto of his country's foreign policy. but he al stressed it's an evolving relationship. >> ( tralated ): as time changes anas the international environment canges, there is a ed for us to furer develop and deepethe u.s.-japan alliance to make it en more constructivand future-oriented alliance. >> reporter: the ime minister took office in septber, after a sweeping electiovictory that ended 50 ye
for the ecomy? plants acro america. nearly00,000 jobs created. we see beyond cars. t national science foundati. supporting edation and reseah across all fields of science and engineering. and with the ongoing suprt of these insitutions and fountions. and... his program was made possibl by the corporati for public broadsting. d by contributions to your s station from ewers like you. hank you. >> lehrer: this was vetens day and many ericans paused to remember the who have served in uniform. the ongoing wars in afghantan andraq, and the shootings at fort hood, tex lent special meing to ceremonies in washington and elsewhere. newshour correspdent kwame holmanas our lead story report. >> holman: a co, steady rain fe on the washingt area as president obama tookart in tradional ceremonies at arlingtonational cemetery. he laid wreath at the tomb of the unknowns then liened as the strains of taps soundd. ♪ from there,he dignitaries moved to the cemetery'memorial ampitheer, where a large crowd waid. secretary of veterans aairs, eric shinki. >> from lexingt and concord to antietam and gettysbg, to the
looks at the rise of hunger in america. major funding for the newshour with jim lehrer is provided by: >> what has made grant thornton a truly global accounting organization, with access to resources in more than 100 countries? is it their global capabilities, or is it their passion for how they serve their clients? grant thornton >> 150 years of financial strength and the experience of an established investment firm have come together. wachovia securities is now wells fargo advisors. the financial advisors nearby and nationwide. with the advice and planning expertise to help you address today's unique challenges, we're with you. wachovia securities is now wells fargo advisors. together, we'll go far. >> this is the engine that connects abundant grain from the american heartland to haran's best selling whole wheat, while keeping 60 billion pounds of carbon out of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. intel. supporting coverage of innovation and the economy. monsanto. the national science foundation. supporting education and research across all fields of science
of this america decision? >> i ink they'retrying to walk a prett fine lne right now. i think it'slear that more is prably better for predent karza they want... they wt more troops, th want the money, the financial they are- many peopl believe they are losing this war right now. they need the help. at th same time, i think he's bn very careful not to publicly embrace the united states, frankly. there's been a lot of friction between th two counies, especially between t election and e fraud that took place there and he is... he is trying to be... avd the perception that he ia puppet the amerian government. when you hear himtalk about what he wants, he wants the support of the sbeshational community butt's in order to strengthen his own ministration, it's to sengthen his afghan ar and this speech, his inauguration speech, he said he wants afghan security fores to take full corol of the security in the countrin five years and many people think that' a pretty ambitious goal but he said he want international private security coanies out at two years. he wants amicans out of running the detention cen
a socialist america. >> holan: no republicans are expected to vote for t democratic bill. instead, they've en assembling aalternative that's expected cost far less but cover far fewer people. house republic leader john boehr. >> this bill is thereatest threat i have se in 19 years i'veeen here. taking away freedoto choose docr, to buy insurance on your own, lead to gornment takeover with ousands of new bureaucrs making decisions for you >> holman: the senate side, health care reform is movin more slowly. democratic majority leader rry reid suggest this week there mighnot be final action until next year. woodruff: find out more abo the scking points on health care reform. we have a preew of the house ebate this weekend on our wb site newshou.pbs.org. >>woodruff: xt, margaret waer continues her reports from afghanistan. toy she looks at the united nations as a target r killers. >> wrner: on a dusty kabul tuesday afternn amid the roar of engines at the ahan catals busy airport the remains of two united nions election volunteers re bid farewelly their colleagues. the unspecial representative to
history in ten years but until then they really are a sign that america, if you can get caught newspaper feelings of american decline, but if you look at how people under 30 are behaving, those go away pretty fast. >> woodruff: very well-spoken, david brook, mark shields, happy thanksgiving. >> woodruff: and finally tonight an encore look at a visit to a famous stage and a musical celebration. jeffrey brown has our story. >> brown: on a recent saturday in austin texas over the course of many hours, the equipment was loaded in and instruments set up. sound system, lights, cameras were ready as producers made last-minute adjustments and then the band took off. for what turned out to be a special night for fans and the group. >> this room here, it's like driving an old buick. ( applause ) >> if you think we're just going to play maybe one or two more songs you're wrong. they're going to have to kick us out. >> brown: indeed the members of this band, one of the world's leading rock'n'roll bands for almost 20 years have played in every kind of venue including owép)enas. but this night with a
that connects us. >> what makes us an engine for the economy? plants across america. nearly 200,000 jobs created. we see beyond cars. >> chevron. this is the power of human energy. and monsanto. grant thornton. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: secretary of state clinton flew to afghanistan today for the inauguration of president karzai. and, she called again for the afghan government to reform itself and clean up corruption. karzai will be sworn in tomorrow for a second 5-year term. gwen ifill has our lead story report. >> ifill: secretary clinton arrived in kabul today at a critical moment, what she called a window of opportunity for the u.s. and afghanistan. >> hello everybody >> ifill: clinton headed into a locked-down afghan capital, where fear o
to the nation schools to be spentw3 over twoears. because we know america can't tcompete theç world tomorrow if our children are being outeducated today, we're making the largest invesent in education in our nation's history. ( apause ) .Ñi >> repter: this yearç, rochester's are was about 0 million. here and in most oer stricts, the bulk of the money restored jobs. 1.6 million brought bk the staff of t work experience >> we have an alternate paway to graduation. we he an opportunity for udents to have choice. th could have been a big,big lo. >> 1, 2ç,, 4, 5. >> reporter: 116,000 fro the stimulus also restored strong starto-jó, arogram serving 757 kindergartenndç first graders. >> i like the way you're ing . >> reporter: crdinator connie was savedrom a lay-off. >> many of our cldren come in t recognizing sic¿ú5"d theyon't hav basi vo"c vocabulary. we catch the problems early on anhavethe children have an exa boost so they would be able to sceed in the year come. >> reporte stimulusçó dollars not only averted cuts. they also helped successlç schools li this one grow. >> greetings
at america, if you can getaught newspaper feengs of american decline, but if you look at how people under 30 are beaving, those go away prett fast. >> woodruff: very well-spoken,avid brook, mark shields, happy thankiving. >> woodruff: and fally tonight an eore look at a visit to a fams stage and a musical celebration. effrey brown has our story. >> brown:n a recent saturday in austin texas overhe course of many hours, the eqpment was loaded in a instruments set . sound system, lights, camas were ready as oducers made last-minute adjustmes and then the ba took off. for whatturned out toe a special nig for fans and the group. >> is room here, it's like driving an old buick ( applause ) >if you think we're just goin to play maybe e or two more sgs you're wrong. they're going to have to kick us out. >> bro: indeed the members of this band, one of the rld's leading rock'n'rolbands for most 20 years ha played in every kind ofenue including owép)enas. but this night with a new alum atop the salesharts they played for just 300. an intimateetting with wonrful acoustics on the famous wooden stage of
's schools to be spentw3 over two years. >> because we know america can't outcompete theç world tomorrow if our children are being outeducated today, we're making the largest investment in education in our nation's history. ( applause ) .Ñi >> reporter: this yearç, rochester's share was about $30 million. here and in most other districts, the bulk of the money restored jobs. 1.6 million brought back the staff of the work experience >> we have an alternate pathway to graduation. we have an opportunity for students to have choice. that could have been a big,big . >> 1, 2ç, 3, 4, 5. >> reporter: 116,000 from the stimulus also restored strong starto-jó, a program serving 757 kindergarten andç first graders. >> i like the way you're doing it. >> reporter: coordinator connie was saved from a lay-off. >> many of our children come in not recognizing basic¿ú5"d they don't have basic vo"c vocabulary. we catch the problems early on and have the children have an extra boost so they would be able to succeed in the years to come. >> reporter: stimulusçó dollars not only averted cuts. they
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)